Be careful in domestic-violence ‘crackdown’

Jun 27, 2012

Your editorial “Give battered women protection they need” is irresponsible journalism. You make a knee-jerk reaction that a new domestic violence bill, A321, calls for electronic monitoring for certain domestic violence offenders. Who would these offenders be? You state that it would protect victims from violent attacks. How is that determined? Based on a “she said, he said” standard of proof? How many domestic violence “victims” cry assault, harassment, terroristic threats where none is found, e.g. no medical records, no police reports, etc.? Are innocent men (and women) going to falsely be put on the ankle-bracelet program with no due process based on an alleged victim’s credibility or a serial accuser — especially during a contested divorce or child custody proceeding where domestic violence orders are used as a “sword rather than as a shield” to obtain unfair advantage in those proceedings.

Before draconian domestic violence laws like this are passed, there must be a major public vetting of them. The state already puts people on ankle-bracelet programs for child support enforcement, even though they are already garnishing wages. And, the defendant has to pay up to $300 per month for the ankle-bracelet on top of the child support obligation. This is unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth Amendment. And, how would real abusers be deterred from trying to approach a past victim if they decide to cut off the ankle bracelet? We all know how slow the police are. As we’ve seen in the past, the piece of paper known as the final restraining order has failed to stop a knife attack or shooting every time.

The public must be informed about the misuse of the domestic violence laws by unscrupulous alleged victims. They can access websites like www.saveservices.org/reports/ and the California State University megastudy on domestic violence http://www.csulb.edu/~mfiebert/assault.htm to obtain real academic and empirical information demonstrating that women are more physically abusive than their spouses or partners and women tend to make more significant numbers of false allegations.

Bruce Eden
Civil Rights Director
Dads Against Discrimination

Source: Daily Record